Ways of managing stress in our

But you have a lot more control than you might think.

Ways of managing stress in our

But you have a lot more control than you might think.

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Stress management is all about taking charge: No matter how stressful your life seems, there are steps you can take to relieve the pressure and regain control.

Why is it so important to manage stress? Stress wreaks havoc on your emotional equilibrium, as well as your physical health. It narrows your ability to think clearly, function effectively, and enjoy life.

Effective stress management, on the other hand, helps you break the hold stress has on your life, so you can be happier, healthier, and more productive. The ultimate goal is a balanced life, with time for work, relationships, relaxation, and fun—and the resilience to hold up under pressure and meet challenges head on.

But stress management is not one-size-fits-all.

Ways of managing stress in our

The following stress management tips can help you do that. Identify the sources of stress in your life Stress management starts with identifying the sources of stress in your life. To identify your true sources of stress, look closely at your habits, attitude, and excuses: Do you blame your stress on other people or outside events, or view it as entirely normal and unexceptional?

Until you accept responsibility for the role you play in creating or maintaining it, your stress level will remain outside your control. Start a stress journal A stress journal can help you identify the regular stressors in your life and the way you deal with them.

Each time you feel stressed, keep track of it in your journal. As you keep a daily log, you will begin to see patterns and common themes. When handling such predictable stressors, you can either change the situation or change your reaction.

Learn how to say "no. Whether in your personal or professional life, taking on more than you can handle is a surefire recipe for stress.

Ways of managing stress in our

Distinguish between the "shoulds" and the "musts" and, when possible, say "no" to taking on too much. Avoid people who stress you out. If someone consistently causes stress in your life, limit the amount of time you spend with that person, or end the relationship.

Take control of your environment. If the evening news makes you anxious, turn off the TV. If traffic makes you tense, take a longer but less-traveled route. If going to the market is an unpleasant chore do your grocery shopping online.

Pare down your to-do list. Analyze your schedule, responsibilities, and daily tasks. Often, this involves changing the way you communicate and operate in your daily life. Express your feelings instead of bottling them up. If something or someone is bothering you, be more assertive and communicate your concerns in an open and respectful way.

Be willing to compromise. When you ask someone to change their behavior, be willing to do the same. Create a balanced schedule.

All work and no play is a recipe for burnout. Try to find a balance between work and family life, social activities and solitary pursuits, daily responsibilities and downtime.Look at your life and find small ways you can do that. For example: Set your watch 5 to 10 minutes ahead.

That way you’ll get places a little early and avoid the stress of being late. Stress can affect you both emotionally and physically. Learn about managing stress with tips to handle life's tricky situations before they get the better of you.

Doing things you enjoy is a natural way to relieve stress and find your happy place. Even when you’re down, you may find pleasure in simple things like going for a walk, catching up with a friend, or reading a good book. When stress makes you feel bad, do something that makes you feel good, even if .

For our ancestors, stress was a survival skill during brief, life threatening situations. Once the danger passed, their stress levels lowered.

However, in today’s world, we are constantly bombarded by stressors, such as work deadlines, traffic, and family obligations. However, when we're constantly stressed and don’t know how to manage it, it can negatively affect our health.

Stress is known to be one of the main root causes of disease. It contributes to nutritional deficiencies, digestive issues, weight changes, eczema, allergies, fatigue, depression, aging, and degenerative diseases.

Our brains are interconnected with our emotions and facial expressions. When people are stressed, they often hold a lot of the stress in their face. So laughs or smiles can help relieve some of that tension and improve the situation.

Get social support. Call a friend, send an email.

5 Ways to Relieve Stress - Center for Mind-Body Medicine